Tags Posts tagged with "reliability"

reliability

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ColdPeaks

With temperatures in Mississippi expected to dip near freezing later this week, Mississippi Power is ready to meet the expected increase in demand. Since heating and cooling costs make up about 50 percent of a residential customer’s monthly bill, taking steps to keep the cold air out and warm air in will help save customers money.

Get ready for cooler weather with these energy-saving tips:
• Set the thermostat to 68 degrees. Each degree higher increases power use by approximately 4 percent.
• Make sure doors and windows are sealed properly. Adding insulation and weather stripping and sealing air leaks around vents and pipes will keep the cold air out.
• Keep the fireplace flue closed when the fireplace is not in use.
• Change the filter in your heating system once a month to improve the efficiency.
• Use electric space heaters with caution. Don’t leave space heaters unattended and keep them away from clothing, bedding and curtains.

More winter weather tips can be found here.

The cooler weather is not expected to cause any outages. If an unexpected outage occurs, Mississippi Power crews will make repairs as quickly as possible. Customers can report and monitor outage repair progress on the Mississippi Power Outage Map.

Mississippi Power, a subsidiary of Southern Company (NYSE: SO), produces safe, reliable and environmentally responsible energy for nearly 187,000 customers in 23 southeast Mississippi counties. Mississippi Power ranked first in the Southeastern Electric Exchange’s 2016 Safety Performance Reports and is consistently recognized as an industry leader in reliability, customer service and safety. Visit our websites at www.mississippipower.com and www.mississippipowernews.com, like us on Facebook, and follow us on TwitterLinkedInGoogle+ and YouTube.

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Mississippi Power Distribution’s reliability results in 2014 set a company record for both the average number of outages per customer and the length of those outages. The company’s SAIDI and SAIFI results were well below the industry average and better than the previous low marks reached in 2013.

System Average Interruption Duration Index, or SAIDI, is the average duration of an outage for each customer served. In 2014, Mississippi Power’s SAIDI result was 55.7 minutes, which was better than the company’s goal of 74 minutes.

System Average Interruption Frequency Index, or SAIFI, is the average number of interruptions that a customer would experience. In 2014, Mississippi Power’s SAIFI result was 0.798, which was better than the company’s goal of 1.04 outages per customer.

“Results like this do not happen by accident,” said Jeff Franklin, vice president of Customer Services Organization. “It takes a tremendous amount of hard work, total commitment to our customers and superior performance to achieve success like this.”

Both results were better than the Southern Company average of 101.5 minutes for SAIDI and 1.069 outages per customer for SAIFI.

“Investments in system infrastructure like our self-healing network and Smart Grid technology have resulted in fewer and shorter service interruptions,” said Randall Pinkston, Distribution director. “But at the end of the day, it’s the commitment to our customers from the line personnel, engineers and operations personnel that drives these results.”

As part of the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Investment Grant, Mississippi Power recently added automation and several self-healing networks to its Distribution system. The automated devices reduce the duration of some outages by allowing operators to isolate problems before field personnel have arrived on-site. The self-healing networks determine where a fault is located and isolate it without any human intervention.

“We work extremely hard to reduce both the number and length of service interruptions,” Pinkston said. “We maintain our system and equipment and aim every day to keep the lights on for our customers.”

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Kemper-July-14

Mississippi Power’s monthly Kemper County energy facility status report with the state Public Service Commission includes an additional $418 million pre-tax estimated probable loss for the third quarter of 2014 and an extension of the plant’s expected in-service date to the first half of 2016.

As previously announced, the company has been reviewing the schedule for the remainder of the project, including the gasifier and gas clean up facilities. Additional time is required for start-up activities and operational readiness, including enhancing the scope of specialized operator training.

“While it will take longer to complete the project, and the capital costs are higher than expected, Mississippi Power still believes in the team that is responsible for constructing and starting up the plant, along with the operations team currently running the combined cycle and training personnel for full operation of the gasification facility,” CEO Ed Holland said.

“These teams are working hard to bring this plant safely online for the benefit of Mississippi Power customers for decades to come,” he added.

Major construction on the project is “essentially complete” and the combined cycle portion of the plant has been in service since early August. The plant has been running at a capacity factor of 80 percent and has a reliability rate four times better than the industry average for combined cycles, Holland said.

The company continues to be committed to the long-term success of the project and the implications it has for coal use around the world. Last month, the top climate technology official for the United Nations toured the plant and said the project “gives hope” to developing countries.

Certain information contained herein is forward-looking information based on current expectations and plans that involve risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking information includes, among other things, statements concerning the cost and schedule for completion of the Kemper County energy facility.
Mississippi Power cautions that there are certain factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking information that has been provided. The reader is cautioned not to put undue reliance on this forward-looking information, which is not a guarantee of future performance and is subject to a number of uncertainties and other factors, many of which are outside the control of Mississippi Power; accordingly, there can be no assurance that such suggested results will be realized. The following factors, in addition to those discussed in Mississippi Power’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013, and subsequent securities filings, could cause actual results to differ materially from management expectations as suggested by such forward-looking information: the impact of recent and future federal and state regulatory changes, as well as changes in application of existing laws and regulations; current and future litigation, regulatory investigations, proceedings, or inquiries; available sources and costs of fuels; state and federal rate regulations and the impact of pending and future rate cases and negotiations; ability to control costs and avoid cost overruns during the development and construction of facilities; ability to construct facilities in accordance with the requirements of permits and licenses to satisfy any
operational and environmental performance standards and to integrate facilities into the Southern Company system upon completion of construction; advances in technology; actions related to cost recovery for the Kemper County energy facility and satisfaction of requirements to utilize investment tax credits and grants; Mississippi PSC review of the prudence of the Kemper County energy facility costs; the outcome of any legal or regulatory proceedings regarding any settlement agreement between Mississippi Power and the Mississippi PSC, the March 2013 rate order, or the State of Mississippi legislation designed to enhance the Mississippi PSC’s authority to facilitate development and construction of baseload generation in the State of Mississippi; and the ability of counterparties of Mississippi Power to make payments as and when due and to perform as required. Mississippi Power expressly disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking information.

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An aerial photo of the Kemper Co. energy facility.

Mississippi Power today filed its monthly Kemper County energy facility project status report with the Mississippi Public Service Commission outlining construction milestones and costs.

The filing identified additional estimated costs subject to the cost cap in the aggregate amount of approximately $88 million including $29 million previously reported in the July PSC report and $59 million reported in the August report.

The estimated cost increases reported in August are due primarily to construction, start-up and operational readiness activities, as well as additional property taxes and insurance. The report also noted the company expects the Kemper IGCC will be placed in service later during 2015 than the previously scheduled in-service date of the second quarter 2015.

“Mississippi Power and Southern Company remain committed to this project. Our investment in integrated coal gasification and the Kemper project – and our belief that this technology represents the future of coal in energy production – has not changed,” said Mississippi Power CEO Ed Holland.
Mississippi Power customers will not pay a penny of cost above the limit agreed to by regulators and legislators.

This latest report also outlined significant milestones achieved at the Kemper facility, including placing the combined cycle into service this summer to help serve customers’ energy needs during peak summer season.

Additional information about the Kemper County energy facility is available at mississippipower.com.

Certain information contained herein is forward-looking information based on current expectations and plans that involve risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking information includes, among other things, statements concerning the projected cost and schedule for the completion of construction and start-up of the Kemper IGCC. Mississippi Power cautions that there are certain factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking information that has been provided. The reader is cautioned not to put undue reliance on this forward-looking information, which is not a guarantee of future performance and is subject to a number of uncertainties and other factors, many of which are outside the control of Mississippi Power; accordingly, there can be no assurance that such suggested results will be realized. The following factors, in addition to those discussed in Mississippi Power’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013, and subsequent securities filings, could cause actual results to differ materially from management expectations as suggested by such forward-looking information: the impact of recent and future federal and state regulatory changes, as well as changes in application of existing laws and regulations; current and future litigation, regulatory investigations, proceedings, or inquiries; available sources and costs of fuels; state and federal rate regulations and the impact of pending and future rate cases and negotiations, including rate actions relating to fuel and other cost recovery mechanisms; ability to control costs and avoid cost overruns during the development and construction of facilities, which include the development and construction of generating facilities with designs that have not been finalized or previously constructed, including changes in labor costs and productivity factors, adverse weather conditions, shortages and inconsistent quality of equipment, materials, and labor, contractor or supplier delay, non-performance under construction or other agreements, operational performance, operational readiness, including specialized operator training, unforeseen engineering or design problems, delays associated with start-up activities (including major equipment failure and system integration), and/or operations; ability to construct facilities in accordance with the requirements of permits and licenses to satisfy any operational and environmental performance standards, including any Mississippi Public Service Commission (PSC) requirements and the requirements of tax credits and other incentives, and to integrate facilities into the Southern Company system upon completion of construction; advances in technology; actions related to cost recovery for the Kemper IGCC, including actions relating to proposed securitization, Mississippi PSC approval of Mississippi Power’s proposed rate recovery plan, as ultimately amended, which currently includes the ability to complete the proposed sale of an interest in the Kemper IGCC to South Mississippi Electric Power Association, the ability to utilize bonus depreciation, which currently requires that assets be placed in service in 2014, and satisfaction of requirements to utilize investment tax credits and grants; Mississippi PSC review of the prudence of Kemper IGCC costs; the outcome of any legal or regulatory proceedings regarding the Mississippi PSC’s issuance of the Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the Kemper IGCC, the settlement agreement between Mississippi Power and the Mississippi PSC, the March 2013 rate order, or the State of Mississippi legislation designed to enhance the Mississippi PSC’s authority to facilitate development and construction of baseload generation in the State of Mississippi; and the ability of counterparties of Mississippi Power to make payments as and when due and to perform as required. Mississippi Power expressly disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking information.

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Afternoon thunderstorms can put a damper on summer fun and often keep MississippiStorm-Ready-iPhone-NC Power crews busy. Outages don’t happen often thanks to regular maintenance of our system, but when they do, our number one priority is restoring power safely and quickly.

Mississippi Power’s storm readiness and reliability is featured this in this month’s issue of South Mississippi Living magazine. The article shares information about the team that works to keep power flowing 24/7 -365.

On the rare occasions the lights do go out, customers can report outages and check the progress of repairs with our online outage map available for smartphones and tablets and enhanced emails and text alert tools.

Signing up for email or text message notifications online is simple. Customers first should log into their accounts on mississippipower.com. Once there, click on “Set Outage Alerts” and choose contact preference by selecting text, email or voicemail and provide the needed contact information. Customers can also set a time of day they don’t want to be contacted.

To sign up for text alerts, customers simply text “REG” to “MSPWR” or 228-207-7377 and they’ll have the option to sign up using their phone number or Mississippi Power account number.

Customers can also report and get outage information with the MS Power Outage Center app available for free in Android and Apple stores.

Click here to read our article in South Mississippi Living magazine.

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06_02_StormMississippi Power employees are monitoring the development of the first named storm of the 2014 Atlantic Hurricane Season. Tropical storm Arthur formed off the coast of Florida Tuesday morning. While current predictions have TS Arthur remaining on the east side of Florida as it moves north, Mississippi Power crews are watching the track and stand ready to assist in those areas if necessary.

Mississippi Power encourages customers to take this time now, before a storm threatens the Gulf, to prepare their homes and make sure their families have an updated storm plan of their own. A checklist of preparations and safety advice can be found on mississippipower.com. In addition, current news from the company is available at mississippipowernews.com, Mississippi Power’s new online NewsCenter where customers and the media can find the latest company information, photos and videos.

Before, during or after a storm, customers who experience a power outage can view Mississippi Power’s online Outage Map using a smart phone, tablet or laptop anytime to report an outage and track utility crews as they work to safely restore power. Customers can sign up to receive email or text alerts about any power outage that might affect them, including information on how long the outage is likely to last and when the outage has been restored.

Signing up for email or text message notifications online is simple. After logging into their account on mississippipower.com, customers should select “Set Outage Alerts.” Or they can sign up for text alerts by texting “REG” to “MSPWR” or 67797. They’ll have the option to sign up using their phone number or Mississippi Power account number to register through text.

The free Mississippi Power Outage Center is available in Android and Apple stores.
Customers can also report power outages by calling the dedicated outage line at 1-800-ITS DARK. For all other inquiries, call the customer service line at 1-800-532-1502.

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In an effort to keep you better informed, Mississippi Power is launching several new interactive tools focusing on outage communication and company news.

Customers can now report, receive notifications and track outages if they occur at their home or business through a new state-of-the-art communication system that includes email and text alerts, as well as the outage map that launched late last year.

The company is also unveiling its online NewsCenter featuring the latest company information, photos and videos. The site, mississippipowernews.com, is designed to keep customers updated regularly on the company’s industry, reliability and community efforts across Southeast Mississippi.

“We know from customer feedback and communication trends across our industry that customers want more options in how they receive information,” Corporate Communication Director Christy Ihrig said. “These tools will bring the latest Mississippi Power information right to their screens and keep them up-to-date on company news, including storm restoration and industry trends, as well as if an outage does occur.”

The enhanced outage notification system – which is designed to work with smartphones, tablets or computers – allows customers to check on the status of their outage through text, email, or the Mississippi Power Outage Center App on their smart device.

Once a customer signs up, the system will automatically send updates about any power outage that might affect them, including information on how long the outage is likely to last and when the outage has been restored.

Signing up for email or text message notifications online is simple. After logging into their account on mississippipower.com, customers should select “Set Outage Alerts.” Or they can sign up for text alerts by texting “REG” to “MSPWR” or 67797. They’ll have the option to sign up using their phone number or Mississippi Power account number to register through text.

Customers can also report and get outage information with the Mississippi Power Outage Center app available for free in Android and Apple stores.

“Instant notifications are just one example of how Mississippi Power is evolving our service,” said Customer Operations Manager Charlie Sentell. “Making use of new technology is a great way to keep our customers in the loop.”

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Members of the local and regional media toured Mississippi Power’s Anthony J. Topazi Operations Center Monday to learn firsthand the steps the company takes to prepare for storm restoration.

The Operations Center opened in 2008 and houses Mississippi Power’s most critical storm restoration functions.

“We needed someplace that was safe for our employees to be able to get our work done when a storm hits,” said Jeff Franklin, Customer Services Organization vice president.

Randall Pinkston, distribution director, said the company begins preparing for storm season in January.

“No two storms are alike,” he said. “So, we work week in and week out on our storm plan to make sure we are ready before a storm hits.”

Each May, 20 to 25 storm directors, representing different functional areas of the company, participate in a tabletop exercise mimicking the actions employees would take if there is a hurricane in the Gulf.

“At the end, we critique ourselves and the decisions we’ve made to see where there’s room for improvement and where we could have handled things differently,” Pinkston added.

Part of preparing for storm season also means having materials and supplies on hand that could run short once a storm hits, and securing staging areas for storm restoration crews, equipment and materials that will be needed as part of restoration efforts once a storm has passed.

“The key to storm response is being prepared in advance,” Franklin said. “Our entire focus is on getting the lights back on. We know how much our customers count on us. We take that seriously. We just want to make sure we’re doing everything we can to make restoration safe for our customers and our employees.”

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06_02_StormJune 1 marked the official start of storm season. Regardless of national forecasters predicting a less active hurricane season for 2014, the company continues to prepare for the worst.

“There’s nobody better than Mississippi Power in getting the lights back on, especially during storms,” Customer Services Organization Vice President Jeff Franklin said. “Before bad weather hits, you need to be familiar with your storm assignment, which may be different from your day to day duties. We are going to need everyone’s help if a storm comes our way.”

Preparation continues to be the company’s mantra before, during and after a storm.

“It’s important for customers to realize that Mississippi Power doesn’t begin preparations as a storm enters the gulf, we start preparing in January and continue to make adjustments up until the storm makes landfall,” Distribution and Storm Director Randall Pinkston said. “In addition, we’ll fine tune the process throughout the year based on non-hurricane events such as tornados or other severe weather to make sure we are truly prepared for any natural disaster.”

While leadership believes the company is ready, the preparation theme rings universal not only at work, but especially at home before the Gulf of Mexico becomes active.

“The time to prepare your home and family is now, before we’re under storm watch,” Franklin said. “The ‘Circle of Life’ philosophy is about keeping the customer at the center of everything we do. We need to be ready at home so we can focus on restoring customers quickly and safely while on the job.”

Before, during and after a storm event, it’s important for employees to know how to access company information at their desk or on the go. Continue to check email, ENN!, Storm Ready and Dialogue.

Because the majority of employees have a mobile device, the new mobile version of Dialogue was designed to look almost exactly like the desktop version with access to Storm Ready. Employees can access Dialogue by using the same web address as they would in the office – http://sotoday.southernco.com/mpc/dialogue. Employees will then be prompted to provide their Southern Company ID and password.

Take a minute to bookmark the Dialogue Mobile web address in your phone so you’ll have it when you need it. In addition, don’t forget to update your contact information in SHIPS and sign up for Dialogue Alert for breaking news texted to your phone.

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